The Holy Grail of Christmas Gifting

How often have you found yourself making frowny faces amidst carefully shredded wrapping paper during Christmas? Don’t feel guilty, we have all been there. You cannot control what people get you. But to save your loved ones from the same fate, there i s one solution. Gift better. We have compiled the Holy Grail of Pro Tips for Christmas Gifting into a single article, and here’s what we found:

On Sleuthing For Ideas:

● Take to social media! Check what they are liking on Facebook, posting about on Instagram, or hinting at in their Amazon wish list. ● If you truly wish to hit home with your present, pay attention to what they complain about. And if you find something that proves as the perfect solution, go for it. ● Offer something that helps with their hobbies if you find out what they do in their free time. Something like online pottery lessons or a subscription to Masterclass should do the trick. ● Even after leaving no stone unturned, you still can’t think of the perfect Christmas present, ask someone close to them or directly ask them yourself.

On Finding The Special Something:

● We all have that one quirk we’re famous for. Maybe you are the tech geek of your squad, or the sophisticated wine aunt of your lot. Pick something from your niche that you know they would appreciate, like the latest SmartWatch. ● If you wish to give something memorable that will last forever, instead of diamonds, arrange for an experience . A scuba diving lesson or a unique dining experience, or even a stay at our Boutique Hotels in Poes Garden! ● If you know them well enough, a very kind, Christmas-y thing to do can be donating in their name to a cause that you know they are very passionate about. ● Lastly, the most intimate gift you can give someone you love is your time. Offer to pitch in your time to help out or cook dinner for two. They will appreciate this more than anything else you can give them. ● You can also try shopping based on shared interests. This way, you have a better idea of what they might need, and what would be held in high regard. ● Gift cards do not have to be necessarily unthoughtful. Instead of just handing over the card, personalize it with a handwritten letter and gift wrap it in pretty packaging along with something cute! ● If you wish to go that extra mile, it makes good sense to include a greeting card along with the gift to add a personal touch. Hunting for gifts is always fun. All in all, we hope this keeps you busy and excited in the coming weeks leading up to Christmas. For those of you who have family in Chennai, we really hope you’re making plans to stay with us for the holidays, and until then, happy shopping!

Will the Pandemic Stop Margazhi?

It’s time. We have been getting teased about it for the past few months. With everything that’s been happening around us, we really need things to get back to normal, especially the Margazhi Music Festival. This sentiment is also shared by most of the Margazhi aficionados, as well as the organizers. And quite understandably so, The Music Academy has been conducting the event since 1928, every year without fail and they don’t plan on letting this stop them. To accommodate for the pandemic, the President of The Music Academy, N. Murali has decided to shift the event online, “Since 1928, the year in which the Margazhi Festival was founded in Madras by the Academy, we have been hosting it uninterruptedly. Even during World War II and the 2004 tsunami, the festival continued. However, this year, with the pandemic still raging unabated and the uncertainty that looms large because of it, we have decided to take the festival online.” he says. Like the Madras Music Academy, others have also followed suit, organizing online events, and conducting recording sessions in preparation. The general mood among the patrons, however, seems to sway between online and offline. While most sabha goers are close to becoming senior citizens, health concerns prevail. But on the other hand, open-air events and strict hygiene protocols make live concerts a plausible option and sabha veterans are vehement about not giving up on this culture. But Margazhi has become more than just an event. In recent years, it has evolved into a bustling ecosystem. Sabha caterers depend on Margazhi to scout contracts for the coming year. And with the onset of digital venue events, sabha-hoppers also find the experience lackluster without having Mysore bondas to wash down the music with. On the brighter side, many sabha caterers like K Srinivasan, son of veteran caterer ‘Mountbatten’ Mani Iyer, have had a chance to step up their game and try something innovative. All around, there are talks of online delivery and other avenues being explored. We might see the full experience unveiled right at home just yet. Considering everything that’s been said, without further ado, here’s a list of the online and offline events happening this year. Choose at your convenience, and most of all, stay safe. ● 94th Annual Concerts (Digital) 2020 December 24th-31st, 2020 ● Charsur Carnatic Season December 15th-30th, 2020 charsur.in.live ● Yours Truly Margazhi December 15th, 2020- January 15th, 2021 kalakendra.com/yours-truly-margazhi/ ● R. R. Sabha Music Festival December 10th-18th, 2020 rasikaranjanisabha.org ● Bhavan’s music fest November 28 to December 19 www.thehindu.com/entertainment/music/bharatiya-vidya-bhavans-o pen-air-margazhi-festival/article32744722.ece ● 87th South Indian Music Conference December 18th, 2020- January 4th, 2021 www.livechennai.com/indian_fine_arts_society_conference_festival_20 20_3.asp Regardless of how you choose to enjoy the Margazhi season, be sure to stay safe and enjoy the show. And most importantly, don’t forget your freshly brewed coffee in a davrah!

Love in the time of Corona

We, as a community, are finding it difficult to adapt to the current situation, and social gatherings are still a big no-no. However, the pandemic doesn’t seem to be going anywhere. While most of us seem to have come to terms with it, weddings, on the other hand, are oftentimes a necessity. Fortunately so – we need something to brighten our lives with, and what more deems life worthy than finding happily ever after? There could be a million reasons as to why a wedding might be unavoidable, spouses traveling abroad, people missing the auspicious date and time, being the most common ones. But even so, a pandemic wedding is a great idea mainly because you are in control. A wedding during the pandemic can help you in so many ways. You can have a limited guest list, and nobody will raise their eyebrows. People are more understanding nowadays.

On organizing weddings

As millennials, you can finally have your simple sweet wedding with only your closest family. A great benefit of that is a reduced carbon footprint with lesser people opting to travel from all over the world and lesser wastage. We have done some research, and this is a great place to get started on making decisions regarding your big day: ● Actively look for an outdoor venue. The more space, the safer it is for everyone around you. ● Communicate your expectations clearly with your guests. Inform ahead about masks, travel and stay arrangements, and other necessities. ● Send out an RSVP to all your guests and get the exact number of attendees so that you are not overwhelmed on the big day. ● Provide an adequate amount of masks and sanitizers for every guest – and at all common areas, especially the dining area. ● Ensure the safety measures taken by the vendors – such as masks and gloves on the caterers, etc. ● Check the local government’s rules on weddings/events in your area. ● Be mindful of the venue and how many people it can host comfortably. ● Lastly, thank your guests for attending your wedding. Regardless of the endless security measures you took, it is a big deal that they are willing to attend and share memories.

On attending weddings

In case you are attending a wedding, as opposed to organizing one. We do have some helpful tips for you too. A lot of people are taking pandemic precautions seriously, but there is still a small percentage who have not wrapped their heads around the current situation. In such cases, the responsibility to be safe falls on you. Here are a few things that you can do to keep yourself as safe as possible, ● Ask your hosts a lot of questions before you leave – specifics about how they have arranged for your safety. ● Make safe travel arrangements. For more information, take a look at this post about travel from last month. ● If social distancing is not maintained, consciously keep a safe distance from everyone else at the event. ● If you have the option, prefer to use disposable cutlery always. Additionally, carry your own water bottles. ● Regardless of how safe you play it, have a backup plan just in case. Look up hospitals and possible self-quarantine options. If you are looking for a quaint, lush green venue with the essence of old-world Madras, our venues at Hanu Reddy Residences offer you a unique option of using a combination of our Banquet Hall, Terrace Gardens, and Courtyard to conduct your wedding within our premises. For a more picturesque outdoor setting, you could also take a look at SPP Gardens. The elegantly landscaped outdoor wedding locations are perfect for your Instagram! We would like to stress that all the things we spoke about go for weddings with a limited number of guests. The days of grand gala weddings are indeed over for now. If your heart rests on a Bollywood wedding, our solution is to have a simple wedding now and conduct the reception on a later date. After all is said and done. If there is no way around it, and you do have to get married during COVID-19, we understand. And we are here to help you every step of the way.

The Season of Melodies – Carnatic 101

The traditional South Indian musical artform is known for having a melody for every mood, time, and season. And the opportunity to become a discerning patron is once again upon us with Margazhi season just around the corner.

For example, Bilahari, a morning raga exudes refreshing happiness, while the raga Amruthavarshini is said to bring showers. Each raga is potent, weaving magic through a specific sequence of notes. Each engenders an experience that is intimate with nature, and the divine.

In a typical performance, a solo vocalist brings to life mythical tales of bhakthi, love, and salvation, supported by the graceful tunes of a veena or a violin, and set to resounding tala (complex beat cycles) emanating from hand drums such as mridanagam or ghatam. The singer, eyes drawn close in surrender, explores the emotive force of the raga to its fullest. With the Kalpana sangeetham every rendering arises from the imagination, allowing room for soulful improvisations.

A rendezvous with the grand ragas

Over the ages, many composers have crafted masterpieces, but a few have become the quintessential rendition of the raga in which they are composed.

Raga Sankarabharanam is considered the adornment of Lord Shiva himself; Kalyani, the queen of ragas ushers in auspiciousness, and is the melody often played in weddings; the deep and sombre raga Thodi inspires humility that leads to wisdom; Kamboji has given birth to devotional masterpieces such as ‘O Rangasayee’ – the song is an earnest appeal to the Brahman beseeching grace and union with godhead; ever rich Bhairavi is likened to a prayer booming forth to the supreme consciousness. These constitute the 5 grand ragas of Carnatic tradition, and have given birth to the most number of compositions.

In one of the lighter and playful songs composed in Chenchurutti, in a song addressed to Lord Krishna, mother Yashoda tries to coax him out of going out in the open to herd cows. The rest of the song is an endearing repartee between the mother-son duo. Does it come as a surprise that the son has the final word? Listen to this infectious, and heartening song vocalized by famed singer Aruna Sairam.

For a taste of the popular ragas all packed in one song, look to mainstream cinema where the song Oru Naal Podhuma, masterfully rendered by late singer Balamuralikrishna makes an appearance in the 1965 Tamil epic, Thiruvilayadal. Appreciate the genius as the song effortlessly meanders from Thodi to Darbar, Mohini, and Kaanada.

A one of a kind music festival

But, come Margazhi, it rains all kinds of melodies all over Chennai.

Every year, between Dec 15 and Jan 15, the city hosts around 1,500 to 2,000 carnatic music concerts with an assortment of panel discussions, themed performances, harikathas, and jugalbandis, all accompanied by delightful food from the sabha canteens. This sparkling event is a one of a kind celebration of classical music in all of Asia dating back to 1927.

If you are a music lover fortunate enough to be in Chennai this December, here is a roundup of all the happening places of the city. The top sabhas are located around the cultural centres of Mylapore, T Nagar, and Alwarpet.

The Music Academy: Chennai’s Margazhi kuctheri season took roots in the Music Academy. One of the biggest sabhas in the city, it is a reputed cultural landmark which has A-listers vying for a spot to perform. It needs no mention that the institution draws huge crowds every year. This year, stalwarts like Kunnakkudy M Balakrishna, Sudha Ragunathan, Dr S Sowmya, Ranjani and Gayathri, Aruna Sairam, Neyveli R Santhanagopalan, Bombay Jayashri Ramnath, and other artists of renown are set to captivate the audience with their enthralling musical renderings.

Naradha Gana Sabha: Located in TTK road, the sabha features both upcoming and established singers. This year, there are kutcheris by Unnikrishnan, Dr. K J Yesudas, Sid Sriram, Nithyashree Mahadevan, Shobana, and other lead singers.
Brahma Gana Sabha, and Kalakshetra foundation are other prominent institutions which curate interesting art, theatre, music, and dance performances.

Chennai truly comes alive every Margazhi. And, there is no better place to catch it live, and experience the divine music as it unfurls into the human realm.

All You Need To Know About Onam

Onam celebrates the homecoming of demon king Mahabali who once ruled Kerala. It is said that under his judicious rule, Kerala witnessed a golden era.
Celebrated for a glorious 10 days in the Malayalam calendar month of Chingam, with street parades, pookalam, pulikali dance, snake boat race, and much more, Onam transforms God’s Own Country into a festive riot of colours.

The Myth of Mahabali

Bali, in South Indian languages, is sacrifice or giving. Maha bali translates to ‘great sacrifice’.
The story goes that, like his grandfather Prahlada, Mahabali was a seeker of the benevolent grace of Lord Vishnu. Although he had conquered all of the vast lands and heavens, he was dissatisfied with his earthly life. He, therefore, decided to sacrifice all his possessions for the greater good and well-being of his people. It is at this fateful time that a brahmana called Vamana (dwarf) arrives holding an umbrella made of palm leaves over his head.
The kind and generous Mahabali welcomes Vamana, offering the Brahmin anything he wants. Vamana asks the king for all the land that he can cover in three strides. The wish is granted. But, at this instant, Vamana grows taller and bigger, covering the entire universe with his two feet. Seeing as there is nowhere to place his third feet, he asks the king’s head as the third feet, to which the king obliges willfully.
Mahabali makes the master sacrifice, surrendering his own sense of self beyond everything he owns. The great sacrifice happens on the day of Tiruvonam. Onam is therefore a festival of giving, offering, and listening, to the other.
Although he has transcended the realm of earth, Mahabali is granted his wish of returning once each year to meet his people.

The Onam Affair

Onam marks the yearly visit of king Mahabali to his beloved kingdom. There are folktales – Maaveli Naadu Vannidum Kaalam (When Maveli, our King, ruled the land) – that testify to the popularity of the demon king, even today.
Day one marks the preparation for King Bali’s visit. On this day, people decorate the entrances of their homes with colourful floral carpets or Pookalam, with as many as 10 concentric rings of flowers arranged in beautiful patterns and colours. Fascinatingly, more layers and rings are added on consecutive days. Day five unravels in an uproar of sport, with the famed and spectacular snake boat race. Up to 100 oarsmen row the long and elegantly carved snake boats in Aranmula and other regions of Kerala.
It is believed that Mahabali, having arrived in Kerala, visits the homes of his people, on Thiruvonam. Edging closer to Thiruvonam, people prepare and place clay pyramids that represent Mahabali and Vamana, in the center of the Pookalam. Homes are decorated and the grand Onam feast, Onam Sadya, is prepared to treat the visiting king.
Traditionally the sadhya is a delicious spread of a variety of dishes including upperi (banana chips), maranga curry and naranga curry (sour lemon pickles), erissery (a sweet-spicy vegetable preparation) , parripu curry (thick lentil gravy), inji curry (ginger pickle), sambhar (savoury lentil soup), moru kachiyathu (seasoned buttermilk), chenna mezhkkupuratti (fried yam), avial (mixed vegetable with coconut gravy), payasam (sweet rice pudding). Onam is a feast for both the senses and spirit!

Kozhukattai Recipe

Kozhukattai is a South Indian dumpling made from rice flour, coconut and Indian spices. Though normally made sweet, it can also be prepared for savoury palates. While the dish is prepared during the Indian festival of Vinayaka Chaturthi (celebrating the birth of Lord Vinayaka), it is also a favourite during Janmashtami which marks the birth of Lord Krishna.

Ingredients

For the rice dough

● 1 cup powdered raw rice flour
● 2 cups of water
● A pinch of salt
● One spoon of oil

For the sweet stuffing

● 1½ cups of coconut
● ½ cup of jaggery
● ½ teaspoon cardamom powder

How to Make

The stuffing:

1. Add 1 portion of jaggery for every 3 portions of coconut.
2. Mix the coconut and grated jaggery in medium flame.
3. Continue to stir the mixture. You will see the jaggery begin to melt.
4. Cook the mixture until the moisture from the jaggery dries up.
5. Add crushed cardamom and set the mixture aside.

The rice dough:

1. Add 2 cups of water to a cup of raw rice flour in a bowl.
2. Add a pinch of salt and a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the mix.
3. Stir the mixture on a medium flame for up to 15- 20 mins, until it forms a soft dough.
4. Close the pan with a lid after removing from the stove, and let it sit for about 5 mins.
5. Knead the dough to make soft and smooth balls without any cracks. Rub your palm with water to get them smooth and round.

Putting it All Together

1. Flatten the dough balls and fold inwards with your fingers to form a cup. Start from the circumference and keep the center thick.
2. Fill the flattened dough with the coconut and jaggery stuffing.
3. Bring the sides together to form a tomb in the center, and close the dough around the stuffing.

Set the dumplings in a pan greased with ghee or oil. Steam the dumplings for about 10 mins, and serve warm.

The Birth of a Star

Krishna is the most endearing of Gods. His life, as told in the songs, ballads, and epics of India, speaks of the life-affirming thought that defines Indian spirituality. Is there any other God that embodies the joys of life as gracefully, playfully, and as captivatingly, as Krishna? It must come as no surprise then, that he continues to command the love and imagination of so many people.
Janmashtami, Krishna’s day of birth, is the first of many stories that define his time amongst the mortals. The torrential rains that herald his coming into this world, are reflective of the turmoil the people live with, and the ensuing calm, a reflection of the new dawn soon to follow. Through the course of his childhood, he vanquishes many a demon, ultimately slaying the demon king, Kamsa.
Of Krishna, there are as many stories as there are stars in the sky. What makes them so enchanting and captivating is that we learn the simple lessons of life in these stories. His playful nature tells us to not take life too seriously, even if there are much larger things at play.

To celebrate Krishna is to celebrate love.

From the divine love of his consort Radha, to the spiritual longing of Mirabai (the Rajput queen who renounced royal life for the Lord), Krishna has won many hearts, both within and without his leela (act or play). Mirabai’s poems are a testament to Krishna’s emphasis on bhakti (devotion) as a way to salvation.

Come to my Pavillion

  • Come to my pavilion, O my King. I have spread a bed made of delicately selected buds and blossoms, And have arrayed myself in bridal garb From head to toe. I have been Thy slave during many births, Thou art the be-all of my existence. Mira’s Lord is Hari, the Indestructible. Come, grant me Thy sight at once.

    Mirabai

Utterly, Butterly, Simple.

It is no secret that butter was Krishna’s mainstay in Gokul. That is why, on Janmashtami, the special offerings (prasadam) include a sumptuous serving of butter with flattened rice and jaggery.
And as we savour the concoction, we reminisce about the story of butter tax which was levied by Krishna. Krishna made sure to collect his dues from the Gopis (cow herds) of the quaint village by any means necessary – persuasion or coercion. Yet he remained dearly loved by all. If that isn’t evidence of how good intentions outweigh actions, what is?
Today, in parts of India, particularly in Gujarat and Maharashtra, the Dahi Handi (Pot of Curd) is yet another imitation of Krishna’s never-ending antics to have butter. Just as Krishna relied on the support and strength of his brother and friends, during the game of Dahi Handi, boys and men find new brethren among strangers, as they give each other a hand or leg up in pursuit of a common goal.
From the confines of high art, to calendar portraits, and Gokul Sandal tins, Krishna truly permeated modern life in all its nooks in the subcontinent. His stories are so popular that the one about butter tax is captured in a beautiful painting titled “Daan- Lila” in the Harvard Art Museum.
This Janmashtami, we urge you to revel in the simplicity of the Lord’s ways and persevere on this journey that is life, as you celebrate both the little things, and the big things.

Celebrating Holi the Eco-friendly way

Holi is perhaps the only festival in India to have a tagline of its own. Bura na maano, Holi hai! (Don’t be offended. It’s Holi!) captures the essence of this festival. Celebrating the triumph of good over evil, the origins stem from Hindu mythology – the slaying of the demon Hiranyakashipu, and his sister Holikai. Also considered to be the day Lord Kama released five arrows, there is every reason to get in on the festivities – whether you’re taken by the colors, the season, or good old-fashioned love.

This culturally loaded festival is naturally accompanied by a practice that has been around for years. And with the passage of time, the way Holi is celebrated has changed in more ways than one.

Today, Holi comes with its fair share of environmental endangerment. There are rising concerns about pollution – smoke and toxic substances released by fireworks, noise created by large gatherings, and the usage of megaphones, water pollution, so on and so forth.

Other concerns include the skin problems caused by commercially manufactured colours, and how children, stray animals and even pets are exposed to these synthetic materials leading to short and long term damage.

So, let’s resolve to make Holi this year an environment-friendly festival. With climate change in tow, it is imperative that we do so, in what little ways we can.

One of the simplest practices to begin with, is making the gulaal (Holi Colours) at home. Grinding dried hibiscus flowers for red, crushing fresh mint for green, mixing turmeric powder and gram flour for yellow, or simply adding food colour to rice flour are alternatives that are not just good for the environment, but are also a lot of fun to make.

Another way to celebrate a sustainable Holi is to play it dry this year. The thrill of dousing friends with buckets of water, or throwing water balloons at them, may seem irresistible. But, the growing water crisis calls for us to be more reflective and responsible. Spare the pichkaris and play Holi with dry colours.

Holi bonfires from burnt wood are also a major source of environmental degradation as they reduce the much needed green cover provided by trees. Burning organic substances like cow dung or other waste materials instead of wood, prevents trees from being cut down.

At the end of the day, Holi is all about community. So, pledge as a collective to use organic, dry colours and build a grand communal bonfire, rather than one too many around your neighborhood. More the merrier.
May this year’s Holi be a celebration of a life, for one and all.

Of Sugarcane, Cows, and Kites

Pongal, more than just a Harvest Festival

Festivities at the time of the winter solstice are common in many cultures around the world. This journey of the sun northwards marks the beginning of the Tamil month of Thai, bearing great significance to agricultural communities in India. Pongal or Makara Sankaranti as it is celebrated in other parts of India, is the Tamil harvest festival, whose name literally translates to ‘spilling over’.

The origins of the custom go back over a 1000 years. Inscriptions point to a celebration of the Medieval Chola time, called Puthiyeedu . As the name suggests, it is believed to represent the first harvest of the year.

As is the case with most Indian festivals, one day is too short to pack all the novel traditions and joyous ceremonies. Pongal is a 4-day long cultural affair, celebrated by Tamilians worldwide.

Bhogi, 14 January 2019

Popular legend tells the story of little Lord Krishna, who lifted the collosal Govardhan Mountain on his little finger, on Bhogi, to protect cattle and herdsmen from an enraged Indra, King of the Heavens and Lord of the Rains.

Bhogi, the day preceding the main event of Pongal, is meant for cleansing – of the home, body and mind. On this day, people clean their homes, and dispose off old and unwanted items in a communal bonfire made of wood and dried cow dung. This activity is symbolic of parting with vices, unhealthy thoughts and emotions, welcoming spring on a fresh note. Bhogi is ‘spring cleaning’, at its truest.

Thai Pongal, 15 January 2019

Thai Pongal is observed to thank the Sun God for a successful and copious harvest – an Indian Thanksgiving, of sorts. This day marks the highlight of the festival, when the first rice of the season is made into a dish called Sakkarai Pongal and consecrated to the Sun, along with sugarcane, coconuts, and bananas.

As the rice cooks and spills over, it is quintessential to yell ‘Pongal O Pongal’ repeatedly, to honour the abundance endowed by nature

Sakkarai Pongal is a sweet dish made from rice, yellow lentils, milk, and jaggery. It’s cooked in a earthen clay pot, over a wood fire, and decorated with the fresh stem of a turmeric plant.

Maatu Pongal, 16 January 2019

Conventionally, cows were used to till farms, and continue to do so, in many parts of India. The day of Maatu Pongal is thus dedicated to the worship of cows. These gentle animals are bathed in turmeric water, and decorated with garlands around the neck, and paint on their horns.

In towns and villages across Tamil Nadu, you can witness Jallikattu, a traditional bull fight, similar to bull riding in rodeos. In cities, many look forward to the visit of the holy bull, fondly known as the ‘boom boom maadu’ , outside their homes, accompanied by nomadic tribesmen who entertain and tell fortune, based on the nodding of the bull’s head.

To err is…not just human

This is the story of Shiva and his mount, Nandi the bull. Shiva once asked Nandi to convey to the people of Earth to eat once a month, and bathe every day. Mistakenly, Nandi announced to eat every day, and bathe once a month. Enraged at Nandi’s blunder, and concerned of a food shortage, Shiva banished the holy animal to Earth, to help people cultivate crops.

Kanum Pongal, 17 January 2019

‘Kaanum’, in Tamil, means to see or visit. Family reunions are typical of this day; friends and relatives come together and finish the 4-day festival in a grand manner.

The sacredness of Earth and all life is acknowledged in an intriguing ritual called Kannu Pudi , that involves women calling out to birds with a quirky rhyme. A turmeric leaf is laid out on the courtyard, on which is served pongal, flavoured rice balls, sugarcane, betel nuts, and betel leaves, all for the birds to eat.

In different parts of India, the harvest festival goes by different names, and is celebrated in unique ways. But, the one sentiment they all hinge on, is the feeling of gratitude for nature and all it’s living beings.

Uttarayan is a kite festival that takes place throughout Gujarat, and also in parts of Telangana and Rajasthan, on the occasion of Makara Sankaranti . The Sabarmati Riverfront in Gujarat, known as the Kite Capital of India, is one of the best places to witness this colourful and energetic fiesta.

In different parts of India, the harvest festival goes by different names, and is celebrated in unique ways. But, the one sentiment they all hinge on, is the feeling of gratitude for nature and all it’s living beings.