Celebrating Holi the Eco-friendly way

Holi is perhaps the only festival in India to have a tagline of its own. Bura na maano, Holi hai! (Don’t be offended. It’s Holi!) captures the essence of this festival. Celebrating the triumph of good over evil, the origins stem from Hindu mythology - the slaying of the demon Hiranyakashipu, and his sister Holikai. Also considered to be the day Lord Kama released five arrows, there is every reason to get in on the festivities - whether you’re taken by the colors, the season, or good old-fashioned love.

This culturally loaded festival is naturally accompanied by a practice that has been around for years. And with the passage of time, the way Holi is celebrated has changed in more ways than one.

Today, Holi comes with its fair share of environmental endangerment. There are rising concerns about pollution - smoke and toxic substances released by fireworks, noise created by large gatherings, and the usage of megaphones, water pollution, so on and so forth.

Other concerns include the skin problems caused by commercially manufactured colours, and how children, stray animals and even pets are exposed to these synthetic materials leading to short and long term damage.

So, let’s resolve to make Holi this year an environment-friendly festival. With climate change in tow, it is imperative that we do so, in what little ways we can.

One of the simplest practices to begin with, is making the gulaal (Holi Colours) at home. Grinding dried hibiscus flowers for red, crushing fresh mint for green, mixing turmeric powder and gram flour for yellow, or simply adding food colour to rice flour are alternatives that are not just good for the environment, but are also a lot of fun to make.

Another way to celebrate a sustainable Holi is to play it dry this year. The thrill of dousing friends with buckets of water, or throwing water balloons at them, may seem irresistible. But, the growing water crisis calls for us to be more reflective and responsible. Spare the pichkaris and play Holi with dry colours.

Holi bonfires from burnt wood are also a major source of environmental degradation as they reduce the much needed green cover provided by trees. Burning organic substances like cow dung or other waste materials instead of wood, prevents trees from being cut down.

At the end of the day, Holi is all about community. So, pledge as a collective to use organic, dry colours and build a grand communal bonfire, rather than one too many around your neighborhood. More the merrier.
May this year’s Holi be a celebration of a life, for one and all.


Recipe for a Holi meal

A Holi meal is never whole without the inimitable gujiya (sweet dumpling), a traditional pan-indian delicacy. Imaginatively shaped as a half-moon, its rich layered textures and sweet flavours produce a gratifying adventure for the palate. Here’s how you can make gujiya at home for your near and dear, and celebrate Holi in spirit. After all, festivities are all about food and family!

Filling: Add a few spoons of sugar to milk and boil until solid. When cooled to room temperature, add desiccated coconut, sooji( semolina) roasted in ghee, powdered cashew nuts, almond shreds, and raisins to the milk solids. Mix into a sticky paste.

Dough: Mix maida (white refined flour), with a cup of water, a pinch of baking soda and a few tablespoons of refined oil. Add more water and knead to make a soft elastic dough.

Use gujiya molds to get that perfect half-moon crust out of your dough. Fill in the stuffing and fry until golden brown. Dig in and let the delightful milky shreds of almonds, and raisins crumble into your mouth.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *